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    Jobs

    Job Listing: Health Policy Advocacy Program Manager, UCBerkeley SPH

    The Center for Public Health Practice at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health is looking for a passionate and experienced individual to join our team as the Health Policy Advocacy Program Manager. Please pass this opportunity along to your networks.

    Assistant/Associate/Full Field Program Supervisor

    RECRUITMENT PERIOD

    Open Nov 19, 2014 through June 15, 2015

    Next review date: December 19, 2014 Apply by this date to ensure full consideration by the committee.

    DESCRIPTION

    The Center for Public Health Practice (CPHP) resides within the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Its mission is to support students, faculty, alumni, and practitioners to achieve excellence in practice as they promote individual and community health. The Center provides professional, career and leadership development support to students and professionals to enhance their effectiveness and positive impact on public health.

    We are seeking an experienced candidate who is committed to our mission to fill the Health Policy Advocacy Program Manager position.

    The Health Policy Advocacy Program Manager, 75%-100%

    The Program Manager will lead and develop the Health Policy Advocacy Initiative within the Center, campus and community. Fundraising, budget management and reporting are key priorities for this external grant funded initiative. There is

    KEEP READING: Job Listing: Health Policy Advocacy Program Manager, UCBerkeley SPH

    Public Health Education Public Policy

    Are you mentoring a young woman? Consider referring her to Pathways to Policy

    California Center for Research on Women and Families

    Could you help us spread the word about Pathways to Policy? P2P is our mentoring initiative, held in conjunction with the Women’s Policy Summit. All participants will receive a scholarship/sponsorship, so the only costs are related to travel.

    Here is a link to more information:

    http://ccrwf.org/womens-policy-summit/womens-policy-summit-2015/pathways-to-policy-2015/

    Questions can be directed to mentoring@ccrwf.org

    Hope to see you on January 14 at the 2015 Women’s Policy Summit!

    ________________________

    California Center for Research on Women and Families

    2015 Women’s Policy Summit

    Advancing Women’s Health, Wealth & Power

    Wednesday, January 14

    When: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    Add to Calendar

    Where: Sacramento Convention Center, 1400 J St., Sacramento, CA 95814

    Questions? Debra Danner, Event Coordinator danner@ccrwf.org 916-835-9806

    ________________________

    The Women’s Policy Summit is hosted by the California Center for Research on Women and Families (CCRWF)

    Kate Karpilow, Ph.D., Executive Director

    CCRWF is based at the Public Health Institute.

    We are proud to have sponsorship from:

    The California Wellness Foundation

    Kaiser Permanente

    The California Endowment

    Register Now!

    KEEP READING: Are you mentoring a young woman? Consider referring her to Pathways to Policy

    Public Health Education

    Webinar: Making Web Design Work for People with Limited Vision

    The Center for Public Health Practice and the APHA Health Communication Working Group

    Present the Health Communication Matters Webinar Series:

    Making Web Design Work for People with Limited Vision

    Thursday, December 18th

    10:00am – 11:00pm PST / 1:00pm – 2:00pm EST

    Join us for the next session in the Health Communication Matters Webinar Series! This webinar will present the principles of Universal Design and how to apply it to designing websites and print materials that are accessible to people with low or limited vision. Peter Freedman, an expert with 15 years’ experience in web design and e-commerce, will address technical, visual, and regulatory considerations to improve web and print overall effectiveness for readability. Whether you’re tech-savvy or not, have resources or not, you will walk away with the strategies to evaluate and make improvements to the readability of your web and print materials for audiences with limited vision.

    Register now for this FREE event!

    After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe key principles of Universal Design and advantages for the user experience
  • List an example of how layout can improve readability for the visually-impaired
  • Explain how different typographic practices can improve readability
  • The Health Communication

    KEEP READING: Webinar: Making Web Design Work for People with Limited Vision

    CDPH

    CDPH Director Ron Chapman Resigns

    State of California—Health and Human Services Agency California Department of Public Health

    RON CHAPMAN, MD, MPH, Director & State Health Officer

    EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor

    December 3, 2014

    I am very privileged to have worked with all of you since June 2011 when I started as the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer. I am proud of what we have accomplished together over the past several years. Our strong partnership has protected and promoted the health and safety of Californians.

    With so many great accomplishments, I feel that the time is right to move on to new challenges and my last day on the job will be January 31, 2015. I greatly appreciate the support for public health from the Governor, Secretary Dooley, and her Agency staff. I am incredibly proud of the CDPH staff who have partnered with you to strengthen public health and achieve our mission.

    I have no doubt that my work in public health will continue. I look forward to continuing to support local health departments as they prepare for national accreditation and build quality improvement and performance management systems.

    The department could not have accomplished our work

    KEEP READING: CDPH Director Ron Chapman Resigns

    Jobs

    Job Listing: Primary Care Director of Operations, SF Dept of Public Health

    Primary Care Director of Operations

    http://www.jobaps.com/SF/sup/BulPreview.asp?R1=PBT&R2=0931&R3=063867

    Excellent leadership skills essential!

    Under the general administrative direction of the Director of Primary Care, the 0931 Manager III – Primary Care Director of Operations is responsible for the operations of DPH Primary Care clinics. Our fourteen (14) clinics offer a full array of clinical services including, but not limited to: ambulatory primary care; urgent care; behavioral health integration; dental services;podiatry; pharmacist co­ management; nutrition services; mobile eye and mammography services; and tele-health programs.

    The 0931 Manager III – Primary Care Director of Operations performs the following essential duties:

  • Plans, directs, oversees, and resources the operations of DPH Primary Care Clinics;
  • Develops, designs, implements, coordinates, and evaluates clinic programs and services including operational data and metrics to ensure cost effective and efficient primary health care delivery within a managed care model;
  • Develops and implements unit goals, performance standards, policies, procedures, and priorities;
  • Determines resources levels and allocation prioritization to optimize primary care operations;
  • Improves performance by coaching and monitoring the work of subordinates including, but not limited to:Primary Care Center Directors, Practice Managers, and Principal Clerks;
  • Works effectively with DPH Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (SFGH)

    KEEP READING: Job Listing: Primary Care Director of Operations, SF Dept of Public Health

  • Cancer Smoking

    Please pass along these 10 tips to help smokers quit

    Celebrate more birthdays with the American Cancer Society by quitting smoking or helping someone else kick the habit during this year’s Great American Smokeout on Thursday, Nov. 20. Here are some helpful tips on how to break free from a smoking addiction.

    Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States, yet about 42 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. That’s about 1 in every 5 adults. The health benefits of quitting start the moment a person stops smoking. Quitting when you are younger will reduce your health risks more, but quitting at any age can give back years of life that would be lost by continuing to smoke.

    10 tips to help smokers quit

    1) Don’t keep it a secret. Include your friends and family in your quitting process; they can offer much-needed support.

    2) You’re not alone. More and more people are trying to break free from cigarettes and there are lots of support options available. Many communities, employers, and health care organizations have free or low-cost counseling and support available to help you quit. Call your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 to find out what’s available in your area.

    3)

    KEEP READING: Please pass along these 10 tips to help smokers quit

    Jobs

    Job Listing: Program Associate Position with NNPHI

    The National Network of Public Health Institutes (NNPHI) is recruiting a program associate to support planning and implementation of projects and activities that advance NNPHI’s mission.

    The program associate will work independently and collaboratively with staff serving on multiple teams throughout NNPHI and actively support collaboration across NNPHI, our members, consultants, contractors, and partners.

    Job Location: NNPHI maintains offices in Washington, DC and New Orleans, Louisiana. Additional staff, consultants, members, and partners support NNPHI’s mission from several locations throughout the United States. This position will be based in either NNPHI’s New Orleans or Washington, DC offices. www.nnphi.org

    Awards and Fellowships Cancer Prevention

     California Colorectal Cancer Coalition Mini-Grant Request for Applications

    California Colorectal Cancer Coalition (C4) is initiating the third annual community collaborative grant process for fiscal year 2015.

    Applicant organizations are encouraged to apply for grants that are in alignment with C4’s mission to increase colorectal cancer screening rates in an effort to decrease mortality associated with the disease. The C4 mission is to save lives and reduce suffering from colorectal cancer in all Californians.

    C4 plans to fulfill this mission by:

  • implementing strategies to reduce disparities in CRC screening, diagnosis and treatment among underserved populations in California
  • increasing capacity for colorectal cancer screening
  • advocating for CRC screening programs to serve uninsured and underinsured populations.
  • Applications that propose projects related to C4’s priority areas related to colorectal cancer are strongly encouraged:

  • Primary Prevention and Screening
  • Screening Barriers
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Communications
  • Psychosocial/Cultural and Survivorship Issues
  • Cancer Health Care – Delivery
  • Cancer Health Care – Economics
  • Cancer Health Care – Policy
  • The applications are due by December 19, 2014. Funding for successful applications will begin March 1, 2015.

    The C4 website has links to currently accepted practices for CRC screening www.cacoloncancer.org

    Please questions about the grant application process to:

    Dr. Margaret Hitchcock

    hitchcock.margaret2@gmail.com

    530-400-8159 (text or phone).

    KEEP READING:  California Colorectal Cancer Coalition Mini-Grant Request for Applications

    Climate Change

    Will our cities save the planet?

    Forget about stalled international treaties and congressional gridlock. Real solutions to climate change are making a difference—right now—in our cities.

    Together, mayors, city planners, and entrepreneurs are cutting energy use and lowering carbon emissions in myriad ways: more bike paths, mass transit, renewable power.

    Why do local solutions to a global problem matter so much? Because the world’s urban population, for the first time in history, surpassed its nonurban population. Today nearly 54 percent of all human beings—more than 3.8 billion people—live in a metropolitan area. Collectively, these urban centers account for more than 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions and for two-thirds of the world’s energy use. As cities go, so goes the planet.

    In U.S. cities, climate solutions represent a clear path around paralyzing ideological divides. The urban imperative isn’t about politics; it’s about action, on the ground, in real time, where the majority of us live, work, and raise families.

    Will the trains work, or will storm damage suspend service for a year? Do the sewers function or overflow after a downpour? Is the air safe for our children to breathe as they play outside or cause for another visit to the ER? To see the

    KEEP READING: Will our cities save the planet?

    Prevention Public Health Education

    The FDA’s campaign: “DontServeTeens.gov”

    The Federal Trade Commission has developed a public education campaign on teen-age drinking. Their website has tools and information to help parents and others reduce teen drinking and related harm.

    Teens who drink usually get alcohol from “social sources” — at parties, from older friends and family, or by taking it from a cabinet or refrigerator without permission. Teen drinking is linked to injury and risky behavior. We can reduce teen drinking by stopping teens’ easy access to alcohol.

    Help achieve this important goal! Post this message on your website, and use the campaign materials available at www.DontServeTeens.gov

    “Please don’t provide alcohol to teens…It’s unsafe. It’s illegal. It’s irresponsible”.

    Cancer Chronic Illness

    Some good news in treating advanced Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    An experimental immune-system therapy can often lead to complete remission in leukemia patients who have run out of other options, a new study confirms.

    Researchers found that 27 of 30 children and adults with advanced Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) went into full remission after receiving genetically tweaked versions of their own immune system cells. “Ninety percent of patients who had no options left went into complete remission. That’s amazing,” said senior researcher Dr. Stephan Grupp, of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania.

    However, seven patients who went into remission did eventually suffer a relapse, according to the study. The findings, published Oct. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine, confirm what smaller studies have suggested: The therapy offers hope to people with ALL that has repeatedly eluded standard treatments.

    In July, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted the cell therapy a “breakthrough therapy” designation for advanced ALL – which could speed the treatment through the standard regulatory review process, according to the researchers.

    Infectious Disease Prevention

    WHO Revises Global Tuberculosis Estimate up by 500,000

    The World Health Organization has revised up its estimate of how many people have tuberculosis by almost 500,000.

    In 2013 nine million people had developed TB around the world, up from 8.6 million in 2012, the WHO said. However, the number of people dying from TB continued to decline, it added.

    TB campaigners said that one of the biggest problems in tackling the deadly disease was gauging how many people were affected. About 1.5 million people had died in 2013 from TB, including 360,000 people who had been HIV positive, the WHO said in its Global Tuberculosis Report 2014. And in 2012, there had been 1.3 million tuberculosis deaths.

    Source: www.bbc.comm

    Chronic Illness

    Amyloid Hypothesis for Alzheimer’s Disease confirmed

    An innovative laboratory culture system has succeeded, for the first time, in reproducing the full course of events underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Using the system they developed, investigators from the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now provide the first clear evidence supporting the hypothesis that deposition of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a cascade leading to the devastating neurodegenerative disease. They also identify the essential role in that process of an enzyme, inhibition of which could be a therapeutic target.

    “Originally put forth in the mid-1980s, the amyloid hypothesis maintained that beta-amyloid deposits in the brain set off all subsequent events – the neurofibrillary tangles that choke the insides of neurons, neuronal cell death, and inflammation leading to a vicious cycle of massive cell death,” says Rudolph Tanzi, PhD, director of the MGH Genetics and Aging Research Unit and co-senior author of the report receiving advance online publication in Nature.

    “This new system – which can be adapted to other neurodegenerative disorders – should revolutionize drug discovery in terms of speed, costs and physiologic relevance to disease,” says Tanzi.

    CDC Infectious Disease Prevention

    CDC Develops Faster Test for Enterovirus D68

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has begun using a new and faster laboratory test to identify enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), which has sent hundreds, if not thousands, of children to the hospital this summer and fall with breathing problems, and has killed several of them, the agency announced today.

    In a news release, the CDC said it developed a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test that will allow it to process 180 specimens a day compared with 40 specimens a day with the previous technology. The agency cautioned that accelerated testing will cause the number of confirmed cases to shoot up. The rapid increase should not be construed as a real-time change or worsening of the EV-D68 outbreak, they noted.

    More information on [the] announcement is available on the CDC website. www.cdc.gov

    CDC CDPH Infectious Disease

    Enterovirus D68 confirmed in California

    The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has confirmed 4 enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) cases in patients in San Diego (3) and Ventura (1) counties. These are the first confirmed cases in California in 2014 due to EV-D68.

    There are other specimens from throughout the state being tested at CDPH labs. More cases are anticipated in the coming weeks. CDPH has asked local health departments to submit samples from all rhinovirus/enterovirus positive specimens from hospitalized children less than 18 years of age or from clusters of cases of any age to CDPH for further typing. Several specimens have been received by CDPH for testing, and testing is underway.

    EV-D68 causes respiratory illness and the virus likely spreads from person to person when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or touches contaminated surfaces. Symptoms of EV-D68 include fever (although fever may not be present), runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches. Some children have more serious illness with breathing difficulty and wheezing, particularly children with a history of asthma.

    Additional information about EV-D68 can be found on the CDC website at: http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/ev-d68.htmll

    The best ways to prevent transmission of enteroviruses is to:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for

    KEEP READING: Enterovirus D68 confirmed in California

  • CDPH Smoking

    California Tobacco Control Program RFA’s

    In November 2014, the California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) plans to release Request for Applications (RFA), #CTCP 15-100, Achieving Tobacco-Related Health Equity among California’s Diverse Populations, with the intent to fund approximately 25 to 50 projects to prevent and reduce tobacco use among groups with high rates of tobacco use.

    The term of the funded projects is anticipated to be July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2020. Approximately $5.3 million per year will be available from the Proposition 99 Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. Funding is contingent upon available revenues and appropriations by the Legislature and the Governor’s Budget for fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and subsequent FYs.

    Applications are due in January 2015. www.cdph.ca.gov

    Please pass along these 10 tips to help smokers quit

    Events and Programs Smoking

    The Great American Smokeout: Thursday November 20

    Thursday November 20th will mark the 38th Year of the Great American Smokeout. ‘GAS’ was developed by the California Division of the American Cancer Society and first carried out throughout the state of California in 1976. There were 5 million adult cigarette smokers in the state at that time and GAS was an effort to get them to try to quit smoking for a day.

    More than 12,000 Cancer Society Volunteers helped promote and distribute a million pledge cards for this major public education & promotion event. A same-day telephone survey estimated that millions of people were aware of the event and hundreds of thousands of cigarette smokers did try to quit for the day!

    The National Office of the ACS picked this up the following year and it has become an annual, nation-wide campaign to help people stop smoking. For hundreds of thousands, it was the beginning of a personal journey of self-empowerment, leading to a longer, healthier life.

    Thanks to Glenn I Hildebrand, MPH for these notes and update on the Great American Smokeout.

    Please pass along these 10 tips to help smokers quit

    Events and Programs Public Health Education

    Touro University MPH Program Holds Info Night

    Touro University

    Public Health Program

    Change Your Community … Change Your World!

    Attend Fall 2014 MPH Information Night

    Tuesday, November 11, 2014

    6 to 8 pm

    KEEP READING: Touro University MPH Program Holds Info Night

    Jobs

    Zero Breast Cancer Looking for Executive Director

    Zero Breast Cancer seeks an experienced Executive Director to drive the direction and expansion of breast cancer prevention research, advocacy and educational programs in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.

    Zero Breast Cancer (ZBC) is a community-based, non-profit organization founded in 1995 by a small but committed group of women with invasive breast cancer who set out on a remarkable journey to find the causes for the historically high incidence of breast cancer in Marin County and the San Francisco Bay Area. ZBC exists today because we believe the continued high breast cancer incidence rates are unacceptable.

    From the outset, Zero Breast Cancer has differentiated itself from other breast cancer organizations through its unique involvement in research. For the past 19 years, the primary goal of Zero Breast Cancer has been to prevent breast cancer by participating in research aimed at discovering who develops breast cancer and why and what we can do to eliminate the disease. Over the past two decades, Zero Breast Cancer has partnered with senior academic scientists on more than a dozen breast cancer research grants, bringing over 19 million research dollars to Marin County and the San Francisco Bay Area. These grants are investigating

    KEEP READING: Zero Breast Cancer Looking for Executive Director

    CDPH Smoking

    California Tobacco Control Program RFA’s

    In November 2014, the California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) plans to release Request for Applications (RFA), #CTCP 15-100, Achieving Tobacco-Related Health Equity among California’s Diverse Populations, with the intent to fund approximately 25 to 50 projects to prevent and reduce tobacco use among groups with high rates of tobacco use.

    The term of the funded projects is anticipated to be July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2020. Approximately $5.3 million per year will be available from the Proposition 99 Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. Funding is contingent upon available revenues and appropriations by the Legislature and the Governor’s Budget for fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and subsequent FYs. Applications are due in January 2015.

    www.cdph.ca.gov

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